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HMS Warspite Ashore near Prussia Cove, 1947

NumberHESFM:1977.406.1

HMS Warspite ashore near Prussia Cove, April 23rd, 1947. HMS Warspite was a Queen Elizabeth-class battleship built for the Royal Navy during the early 1910s. Her thirty year career covered both World Wars and took her across the Atlantic, Indian, Arctic and Pacific Oceans. She participated in the Battle of Jutland during the First World War as part of the Grand Fleet. Other than that battle, and the inconclusive Action of 19 August, her service during the war generally consisted of routine patrols and training in the North Sea. She was involved in several major engagements, including battles in the North Sea and the Mediterranean, earning her the most battle honours ever awarded to an individual ship in the Royal Navy and the most awarded for actions during the Second World War. For this, and other reasons, Warspite gained the nickname the "Grand Old Lady" after a comment made by Admiral Sir Andrew Cunningham in 1943 while she was his flagship. When she was launched in 1913, the use of oil as fuel and untried 15-inch guns were revolutionary concepts in the naval arms race between Britain and Germany and was a considerable risk for Winston Churchill, then First Lord of the Admiralty, and Admiral John Fisher who had advocated the design. However, the new "fast battleships" proved to be an outstanding success during the First World War. Warspite was refitted twice between the wars, but advances in technology and the cumulative effects of battle damage relegated her to the role of shore bombardment towards the end of the Second World War. Decommissioned in 1945, she ran aground whilst under tow to a breaker's yard in Scotland on rocks near Prussia Cove in Mounts Bay and was eventually broken up nearby.

HMS Warspite Ashore near Prussia Cove, 1947

NumberHESFM:1977.406.2

HMS Warspite ashore near Prussia Cove, April 23rd, 1947. HMS Warspite was a Queen Elizabeth-class battleship built for the Royal Navy during the early 1910s. Her thirty year career covered both World Wars and took her across the Atlantic, Indian, Arctic and Pacific Oceans. She participated in the Battle of Jutland during the First World War as part of the Grand Fleet. Other than that battle, and the inconclusive Action of 19 August, her service during the war generally consisted of routine patrols and training in the North Sea. She was involved in several major engagements, including battles in the North Sea and the Mediterranean, earning her the most battle honours ever awarded to an individual ship in the Royal Navy and the most awarded for actions during the Second World War. For this, and other reasons, Warspite gained the nickname the "Grand Old Lady" after a comment made by Admiral Sir Andrew Cunningham in 1943 while she was his flagship. When she was launched in 1913, the use of oil as fuel and untried 15-inch guns were revolutionary concepts in the naval arms race between Britain and Germany and was a considerable risk for Winston Churchill, then First Lord of the Admiralty, and Admiral John Fisher who had advocated the design. However, the new "fast battleships" proved to be an outstanding success during the First World War. Warspite was refitted twice between the wars, but advances in technology and the cumulative effects of battle damage relegated her to the role of shore bombardment towards the end of the Second World War. Decommissioned in 1945, she ran aground whilst under tow to a breaker's yard in Scotland on rocks near Prussia Cove in Mounts Bay and was eventually broken up nearby.

HMS Warspite, Prussia Cove, 1947

NumberHESFM:1977.415

The battleship HMS Warspite after she went ashore near Prussia Cove, Mounts Bay, April 23rd, 1947 showing the Penlee lifeboat in attendance. The wreck of HMS Warspite at Prussia Cove in April 1947. HMS Warspite was a Queen Elizabeth-class battleship built for the Royal Navy during the early 1910s. Her thirty year career covered both World Wars and took her across the Atlantic, Indian, Arctic and Pacific Oceans. She participated in the Battle of Jutland during the First World War as part of the Grand Fleet. Other than that battle, and the inconclusive Action of 19 August, her service during the war generally consisted of routine patrols and training in the North Sea. She was involved in several major engagements, including battles in the North Sea and the Mediterranean, earning her the most battle honours ever awarded to an individual ship in the Royal Navy and the most awarded for actions during the Second World War. For this, and other reasons, Warspite gained the nickname the "Grand Old Lady" after a comment made by Admiral Sir Andrew Cunningham in 1943 while she was his flagship. When she was launched in 1913, the use of oil as fuel and untried 15-inch guns were revolutionary concepts in the naval arms race between Britain and Germany and was a considerable risk for Winston Churchill, then First Lord of the Admiralty, and Admiral John Fisher who had advocated the design. However, the new "fast battleships" proved to be an outstanding success during the First World War. Warspite was refitted twice between the wars, but advances in technology and the cumulative effects of battle damage relegated her to the role of shore bombardment towards the end of the Second World War. Decommissioned in 1945, she ran aground whilst under tow to a breaker's yard in Scotland on rocks near Prussia Cove in Mounts Bay and was eventually broken up nearby.

HMS Warspite, Prussia Cove, 1947

NumberHESFM:1977.483

The "Warspite" ashore near Prussia Cove, April 1947. The photograph shows people gathered in Prussia Cove looking at the wrecked ship. Some are stitting in a fishing boat, there is a bicycle leaning on the floor, there are numerous crab pots and rope coiled up on the ground. HMS Warspite was a Queen Elizabeth-class battleship built for the Royal Navy during the early 1910s. Her thirty year career covered both World Wars and took her across the Atlantic, Indian, Arctic and Pacific Oceans. She participated in the Battle of Jutland during the First World War as part of the Grand Fleet. Other than that battle, and the inconclusive Action of 19 August, her service during the war generally consisted of routine patrols and training in the North Sea. She was involved in several major engagements, including battles in the North Sea and the Mediterranean, earning her the most battle honours ever awarded to an individual ship in the Royal Navy and the most awarded for actions during the Second World War. For this, and other reasons, Warspite gained the nickname the "Grand Old Lady" after a comment made by Admiral Sir Andrew Cunningham in 1943 while she was his flagship. When she was launched in 1913, the use of oil as fuel and untried 15-inch guns were revolutionary concepts in the naval arms race between Britain and Germany and was a considerable risk for Winston Churchill, then First Lord of the Admiralty, and Admiral John Fisher who had advocated the design. However, the new "fast battleships" proved to be an outstanding success during the First World War. Warspite was refitted twice between the wars, but advances in technology and the cumulative effects of battle damage relegated her to the role of shore bombardment towards the end of the Second World War. Decommissioned in 1945, she ran aground whilst under tow to a breaker's yard in Scotland on rocks near Prussia Cove in Mounts Bay and was eventually broken up nearby.

The Wreck of the SS Mohegan off The Manacles, near Porthoustock, 1898

NumberHESFM:1977.486

Postcard showing the wreck of SS Mohegan off The Manacles. Posted to Miss Moseley, 78, Gerrard Street, Lozells, Birmingham, from Rhoda. Bound for New York, the Atlantic Transport Line's SS Mohegan sailed from Tilbury Docks on 13th October 1898. She was carrying passengers, crew, cattlemen and 1,286 tons of spirits, beer, and antimony. She sailed down the English Channel, keeping close to the coast as she passed Cornwall, but took the wrong bearing. This was noticed by the Coverack coastguard, which attempted to signal to her with warning rockets. The Mohegan, however maintained her course. James Hill, coxswain of the Porthoustock lifeboat saw the ship heading at full speed towards the Manacle Rocks and called his crew. The crew of the Mohegan were finally alerted to the danger, either by signals from shore or by the 'old Manacle bell' from the buoy, and the engines were stopped at 6:50 pm. The ship ran onto the Manacles, embedding the rudder into the rock and tearing the hull open. Dinner was being served at the time and with the loss of power the passengers made their way onto the deck, where attempts were made to launch the lifeboats. Captain Griffith had ordered the fitting of a high second rail inboard of the lifeboats to prevent their being rushed in the event of an emergency, but this now hampered the launching of the boats. Further problems were encountered when the ship listed to port then heavily to starboard. Only two lifeboats were launched, of which one was virtually swamped and the other capsized. The ship rolled and sank 12 minutes after hitting the rocks with the loss of 107 lives. Captain Griffith, Assistant Engineer William Kinley and all of the officers went down with the ship. Only her funnel and four masts remained above water. The Porthoustock lifeboat Charlotte was launched in 30 minutes and rescued most of the survivors from the wreck and the water, 44 people were saved by the attending lifeboats. Many of the recovered bodies were buried in a mass grave in St Keverne churchyard, which was given a memorial stained glass window by the Atlantic Transport Line. The remaining bodies were sent to London for burial, whilst eight were shipped to New York on the Mohegan’s sister ship Menominee.

Silver Greyhound Presentation, Godolphin House, 28th May 1909

NumberHESFM:1977.1078

Presentation of a Silver Greyhound to George Godolphin Osborne, 10th Duke of Leeds, by the tenants of Godolphin Estate on 28th May 1909. The following people are listed as subscribers for the gift and it is presumed that most of them are present in the photograph: Edwin Adams, W H Adams, J E Andrewartha, George Anthony, T J Bailey, J Banfield, J Bennetts, T Benry, R J T Berryman, Trevenen Bettens, W Blackwell, George Blight, W Blight, W J Bowden, E A Bree, Thomas S Bree, Henry Brush, Stephen Champion, Francis Chown, Thomas Christophers, Richard Coad, James Cock, Thomas Cock, John Cornish, Rev H L Coulthard, George Cunnack, Oakley Eddy, C Edwards, John Edwards, Thomas Edwards, Ellis and Son, P Eustice, Thomas Eustice, J H Gilbert, John Gill, E C Goldsworthy, E Harris, J Harvey, Thomas Harvey, T H Harvey, C Harry, Thomas Hocking, F J Hosken, Hosken Trevithick and Polkinghorn Ltd, W T H Hosken, E Hosking, J D Hosking, James Jacka, H James, John James, James James, William James, Jenkin and Smitham, E Jennings, G Jennings, James Johns, J Kellow, G Kellow, R Keskeys, E King, T Kitchen, F Kitto, Alfred Laity, George J Laity, Honor Laity, Joseph Laity, T R Laity, William Laity, Rev J F Lemon, John Liddicoat, Lovering and Company, S Lugg, J Lukey, W Lukey, Richard Luley, E Major, F J Matthew, William Middlin, James Mitchell, J B Mitchell, John Mitchell, Grace Mollard, H A Morris, H McGill Morris, M and E Moreton, John Nicholls, William Nicholls, Thomas Noy, James Pearce, J Pengilley, T H Pengelly, B D Piper, Mary Polglase, Sam Polglase, S J Polglase, George Prout, E Pryor, J Pryor, John Pryor, Peter Quintrell, A E Ratcliffe, Redruth Brewery Company, R H Reed, J Richards, J F Richards, Mrs Richards, Philp Richards, T W Richards, W T Richards, Richards and Trezise, William Roberts, William Rosewarne, Leslie Rowe, W J Rowling, R Sampson, T J Sampson, J L Sleeman, G Smith, W J Staple, John Stephens, Richard Stephens, Thomas Stephens, W Stephens, William Stephens, W J Stephens, C J Tallack, Richard Taylor, C Thomas, Hedley Thomas, J Thomas, John Thomas, John Thomas, Simon H Toll, John H Toll, Henry Toy, John Toy, T R Tregear, W H Tregear, J Tregembo, J Treloar, J Trevaskis, J H Trevaskis, M Trewhella, J M Trezise, J Tripconey, T H Tripp, Jacob J Tyacke, R Tyack, J H Vine, B Vivian, C Wakeham, B Watters, Edward Williams, J Williams, J H Williams, R J Williams, J Wills, William Wills, James Woolcock. Photograph by Henry Opie & Sons.

Helston Constabulary, 1928

NumberHESFM:1977.1679

The Helston Sub Division of the Falmouth Division of Cornwall Constabulary, 1928. Back row, left to right: PC Samuel Pearce (collar number 205, stationed at Porkellis from 6.2.1928 to 8.11.1932 and later Helston), PC John Bennett (collar number 201, stationed at Porthleven from 15.12.1925 to 8.11.1932 and later Helston), PC John Charles Mallet (collar number 113, stationed at The Lizard from 15.12.1925 to 3.10.1930 and later Constantine), PC Walter Henry Dymond (collar number 196, stationed at Helston from 6.2.1928 to 5.12.1930 and previously at Porkellis), PC John Miller (collar number 43, stationed at Breage from 15.12.1925 to 30.7.1931), PC Charles Leslie Teague (collar number 12, stationed at Helston from 16.1.1925 to 3.5.1929), PC Charles Edwin Pearn (collar number 46, stationed at Helston from 4.5.1928 to 24.11.1928). Front row, left to right: PC Edgar Ead (collar number 97, stationed at Mullion from 31.12.1921 to 15.8.1929), Inspector Thomas Lee (stationed at Helston between 30.8.1922 and his retirement on 31.11.1928), Superintendent Thomas Nicholls (Falmouth Division from 30.11.1917 until his retirement on 31.5.1930), Sergeant Samuel John Grainger (stationed at Mawgan-in-Meneage from 1.6.1926 to 30.7.1931), PC Percy Job (collar number 38, stationed at St Keverne from 15.12.1925 to 1.6.7.1931). The photograph may have been taken to mark the retirement of Inspector Lee and it is interesting to note that PC Dymond is incorrectly identified as PC Bassett on the mount of the photograph. Research has found that the collar number 196 belonged to PC Dymond and that there is no trace of a PC Bassett within the Helston Sub Division. It is possible that the police officer's name was changed to Bassett deliberately as on 29.1.1931 PC Dymond was "called upon to resign for discreditable conduct".

Beating the Bounds, Helston, 1928

NumberHESFM:1977.3404

Photographic postcard of a large group of men and boys taken after tea at Blackdowns, Helston, during the Beating the Bounds ceremony on 22nd May 1928. Standing (left to right) a representative from the press, Mr Wesley Moyle, unidentified boy, Rev Gilbert Hunter Doble, S Oates, L Wearne, two unidentified boys, Mr Edwin Richards, Jack Shannon, 3 unidentified boys, Mr J P Rogers, Mr Edwin James, Mr W J Crute. Sitting (left to right) Mr W Maclean, unidentified visitor, Mr J Adams, Mr W J Rogers, Mayor John Bennett Martin, Mr Francis Henry Cunnack, Mr F P Sandry, Rev F G Graham. Sitting on ground (left to right) Mr W J Trezise in centre with 7 unidentified boys. The boys in the group include Cyril Reed, Tom Downing, H Symons, W Rogers and Jack Shannon from the Wesleyan School; Leonard Kinden, Francis Davies, A Hendy, Clifford Jeffery and Walter Bray from the Church School; Gerald Hawke, L Wearne, E Hender, S Oates, C Oliver and R Hart from the County Secondary School. Beating the Bounds is an ancient custom dating back to 1585 which continues to the present day. The perimeter of the Borough of Helston was marked by boundary stones, three of which remain in place today. In the days before maps, it was important to regularly walk the exact boundary to guard against encroachments and pass on this knowledge to the younger generation. A sod of turf was cut and placed on the boundary stone. Many of the children in the photograph can be seen holding sticks which were used to beat the turf. A sprig of May was then stuck into the turf and cheers were given before some of the children were turned upside down to have their heads bumped on the turfed stone. The tea was catered by Messrs J H & S Wearne whose signage can be seen on the left. Photograph by A H Hawke of Helston.

HMS Warspite, Prussia Cove, April 1947

NumberHESFM:2003.8488.60

The wreck of HMS Warspite at Prussia Cove in April 1947. HMS Warspite was a Queen Elizabeth-class battleship built for the Royal Navy during the early 1910s. Her thirty-year career covered both world wars and took her across the Atlantic, Indian, Arctic and Pacific Oceans. She participated in the Battle of Jutland during the First World War as part of the Grand Fleet. Other than that battle, and the inconclusive Action of 19 August, her service during the war generally consisted of routine patrols and training in the North Sea. She was involved in several major engagements, including battles in the North Sea and the Mediterranean, earning her the most battle honours ever awarded to an individual ship in the Royal Navy and the most awarded for actions during the Second World War. For this, and other reasons, Warspite gained the nickname the "Grand Old Lady" after a comment made by Admiral Sir Andrew Cunningham in 1943 while she was his flagship. When she was launched in 1913, the use of oil as fuel and untried 15-inch guns were revolutionary concepts in the naval arms race between Britain and Germany and was a considerable risk for Winston Churchill, then First Lord of the Admiralty, and Admiral John Fisher who had advocated the design. However, the new "fast battleships" proved to be an outstanding success during the First World War. Warspite was refitted twice between the wars, but advances in technology and the cumulative effects of battle damage relegated her to the role of shore bombardment towards the end of the Second World War. Decommissioned in 1945, she ran aground under tow in 1947 on rocks near Prussia Cove in Mounts Bay and was eventually broken up nearby.

Wreck of the Bay of Panama, near St Keverne, 1891

NumberHESFM:2016.13645

The wreck of the Bay of Panama, near St Keverne, in March 1891, by W M Harrison. The Bay of Panama was built by Hartland and Wolff in 1833 and was described as probably the finest sailing ship afloat. Because of her speed she was used on the Calcutta run, and on 18th November 1890 she left that port bound for Dundee loaded with a cargo of 13000 bales of jute. In March 1891 she met up with the worst blizzard Cornwall had suffered for over two hundred years. On 8th March distress flares were fired but because of the driving snow nobody saw them, and in the early hours of the following morning, the Bay of Panama was driven headlong into the cliffs just to the south of Nare Point. The Captain, his wife and six other crewmen drowned. Hardly able to see in the driving snow, and soaked by freezing water breaking over the deck, the Mate took charge and ordered everybody to the remaining rigging. Unfortunately the freezing spray turned quickly into ice, and many of them were frozen to death or died of exhaustion and cold. The Ships Bosun went completely mad, and flung himself off the rigging to drown. Only 17 of the 40 onboard survived. After being rescued, the men were fed and put to bed for the night in the village of St Keverne. The next day, wrapped in blankets they set off for Falmouth in a horse drawn bus but huge snowdrifts blocked the roads and the men were forced to carry on to Falmouth on foot. Joseph H James of St Keverne set out on foot for Falmouth to find out what was to be done with the ship and her cargo because telegraph wires and poles lay broken by the way side. He reached Falmouth utterly exhausted, but capable of delivering his messages, and a purse of gold was publicly presented to him for his bravery. Source: www.submerged.co.uk